Lake Forest Park, Washington
We can show you how to turn your yard into a birdfeeding habitat that brings song, color and life to your home.

Seasonally Savvy

Migration, food preferences and weather vary continuously throughout the year, and these influence the bird activity at your feeders. Being “seasonally savvy” means you adjust your feeding program to match birds' changing behaviors. Learn to embrace seasonal changes, and you will attract more birds and experience even more fun!

For a Seasonally Savvy Bird Feeding Station:

  • Keep your Foundational Feeder and Fat Feeder active and well maintained all year.
  • When bird activity is greater or extreme weather arrives, expand the number of foods and feeders you offer.
  • Change the types of feeders and food as migrating birds arrive, when fledglings begin to show up or as the seasonal habitats change:
    • When Dark-eyed Juncos arrive in the fall, alter your feeding program to include more millet in a feeder near the ground.
    • Add sunflower seeds (in the shell) to your food mix each fall to cater to the caching behavior of chickadees, titmice and nuthatches.
    • Add a water feature to attract migrating warblers and offer Jim's Birdacious® Bark Butter® nearby.
    • Orioles and hummingbirds – offer nectar feeders a week or two before their normal arrival dates. Offer fruit, jelly and mealworms for orioles, too.
    • Add calcium enriched foods during nesting season.

Dash & Cache
Right now chickadees, nuthatches, titmice and jays are hiding food to retrieve and eat at a later time. This behavior is called “caching.” Caching helps birds survive during bad weather and when food sources are low. These birds can store hundreds of seeds a day. Each seed is placed in a different location and they generally remember where each one is, even a month later.

By providing an easily accessible food source, you can help your birds with their caching needs.

Chickadees prefer to cache black oil sunflower seeds; often eating a small portion before hiding it in and under bark, dead leaves, knotholes, clusters of pine needles, gutters, shingles and in the ground. Chickadees cache more in the middle of the day when visiting feeders.

Titmice are rather particular. They choose the largest sunflower seeds available to eat and cache. Titmice and chickadees like to cache seeds within 130 feet of bird feeders; your yard or a neighbor's yard. Often, they tuck seeds into the bark and crevices of a wood pile or on a large branch. They even cache them under mulch in a garden.

Nuthatches prefer heavier sunflower seeds over the lighter ones. Be sure to have some sunflower chips in your blend, too, as they like these 25% more than one in the shell. They cache more in the morning and prefer to hide foods on deeply furrowed tree trunks and the underside of branches. Nuthatches are also known to hide seeds under a shingle or behind wooden siding.

Jays love to cache peanuts, sunflower seeds and acorns. They are especially fond of peanuts in the shell. They bury them in the ground and are known to cache about 100 in a day; emptying a feeder in no time. Watch for them make repeated trips to your feeders (or an oak tree) and fly off. They can travel up to two miles to bury their nutritious treasure.